Edixa Reflex Cameras

(Design and manufactured by Wirgin Kamerawerk, Wiesbaden, West Germany).

Edixa Reflex, 1954-??

Waist-level viewfinder
Shutter: Cloth 1-1/1000 +B
The data above are from [5], but cccording to CBS, shutter speeds are 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000 and B
Flash: Standard F and X synch
Metering: none
Finder: Interchangeable
Battery: none

Non automatic diaphragm
No instant return mirror

Edixa Reflex II A, 1955-??

(also Edixa reflex A)
Interchangeable pentaprism and viewfinder
Shutter: Cloth 1-1/1000 +B
Flash: Standard F and X synch
Metering: none
Finder: Interchangeable
Battery: none

Non automatic diaphragm
No instant return mirror

Edixa Reflex II B, 1955-??

(also Astraflex 1000 in 1958)
Same as IIA, but with automatic diaphragm

Edixa Reflex II C, 1955-??

(also Astraflex LM in 1959)
Same as IIB, but with uncoupled selnium meter on top.

Edixa Reflex II D, 1956-??

(also Edixa reflex D)
Interchangeable pentaprism and viewfinder
Separate slow speed dial, selftimer
Shutter: Cloth 9-1/1000 +B;
Flash: Standard F and X synch
Metering: none

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

Edixa Flex, 1958(?)-??

Like Edixa Reflex but without slow shutter speeds (Shutter from 1/30).

Edixa Flex B, C, D, 1959(?)-??

Like Edixa Reflex IIB, IIC and IID, with Flex body

Edixa Reflex Standard, 1960-??

Interchangeable pentaprism and viewfinder

Shutter: Cloth 1-1/500 +B
Flash: Standard F and X synch
Metering: none

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

Edixa-mat Reflex, (or B) 1960-??

Interchangeable pentaprism and viewfinder

Shutter: Cloth 1-1/1000 +B
Flash: Standard F and X synch
Metering: none

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

Edixa-mat Relex C, D, 1960(?)-??

Like Edixa-mat Reflex, C - slenium meter; D - slow speeds from 9s.

Edixa-mat Kadett, 1961(?)-??

Waist-level (interchangeable) finder
Shutter: 1/30 - 1/500, B
Flash: Standard F and X synch at 1/30
Metering: none

Automatic diaphragm
instant return mirror(?)

Edixa-Mat BL, 1961(?)-1967(?)

Waist-level (interchangeable) finder
(The L in model name stands to Linear shutter speeds - i.e. current speeds 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 etc.)
Shutter: 1 - 1/500, B
Flash: Standard X and F synch, 1/60
Metering: none

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

Edixa-Mat CL, 1963(?)-1967(?)

As Edixa-Mat Bl but with interchangeable pentaprism as a standard option and selenium meter

Edixa-Mat DL, 1963(?)-1967(?)

As Edixa-Mat Bl but with interchangeable pentaprism as a standard option and slow shutter speeds from 9s.

Edixa 750, 1965(?)-??

As Edixa-Mat Bl but without instant retern mirror and shutter 1/30-1/1000.

Edixa Prismaflex, 1965-1969(?)

Fixed pentaprism with microprism focusing
Shutter: 1/30-1/500, B(?)
Flash: ??
Metering: none

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

From Kelvin James : Your site lists the Prismaflex as having a microprism viewfinder focussing aid; mine (serial number 503476 which only arrived today) has the split-image rangefinder screen.
I'm immediately impressed by the feel and appearance, solid, reliable and friendly? if that's an appropriate word for a camera. I didn't have to work out what anything does as it's all clear and sensible. I think those owners moaning about failures feel personally hurt as though an old friend had let them down.

Edixa Prismat, 1965-1969(?)

Like Edixa Prismaflex but with shutter speeds from 1 to 1/1000.

Edixa Prismat CDS, 1965-1969(?)

Like Edixa Prismat but with external CDS meter.

Edixa Prismaflex TTL, 1966-(??)

Fixed pentaprism with split-image rangefinder
Shutter: 1/25-1/1000, B
Flash: Standard F and X synch at 1/60, no hot shoe
Metering: Stoped down match needle CDS meter from entire field
The needle of the meter visible on top not in viewfinder
Finder: Split-image rangefinder in ground glass screen
Battery: ??

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

Edixa Prismat LTL, 1968-(??)

Same as TTL but shutter 1-1/1000, and the meter needle in viewfinder.
Two shutter speed dials.

Edixa Prismaflex LTL, 1968-(??)

Same as Prismat LTL but shutter 1/30-1/1000.

Edixa Electronica TL, 1971-(??)

Fixed pentaprism with split-image rangefinder
Shutter: Cloth 16s-1/1000, B
Flash: Standard F and X synch at 1/60, hot shoe
Metering: Stoped down match needle CDS meter from entire field

Finder: Split-image rangefinder and microprism collar in Fresnel screen

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror
Self timer; battery check; meter needle also visible on top of the camera.
Shuttrer speeds (down to 1/30) are visible in vewfindfer


Following Cameras have two mounts: Edixa bayonet and M42(?)

Edixa-Rex B, 1966-(??)

Interchangeable pentaprism with interchgangeable screens.
Shutter: Cloth 1-1/1000, B
Flash: Standard F and X synch at 1/60, no hot shoe
Metering: none

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

Edixa-Rex D, 1966-(??)

Same as B, but shutter from 9s + selftimer.

Edixa-Rex CDS, 1966-(??)

Same as B, but with external CDS meter with needle on top.

Edixa-rex TTL, 1966-(??)

Fixed pentaprism with split-image rangefinder
Shutter: 1-1/1000, B
Flash: Standard F and X synch at 1/60, no hot shoe
Metering: Stoped down match needle CDS meter from entire field

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror

Edixa Prismat TTL, 1967-(??)

Fixed pentaprism with split-image rangefinder
Shutter: 1-1/1000, B
Flash: Standard F and X synch at 1/60, no hot shoe
Metering: Stoped down match needle CDS meter from entire field

Automatic diaphragm
Instant return mirror


Should you buy Edixa?

Quote from [1]: "... Edixa equipment rarely operates well for very long and is not particularly easy to repair". But, as it is usual with old cameras, you can find a perfect example.

From Franck Maubuisson:
I bought an old Revue wich is obviously a renamed Edixa, with an Isco lens. Well, it doesnt work due to a film transport problem, still I observed that the Edixa mount is slightly different from the standard: when I screw the lens on another body, or another lens on the body, the indexes for diaph and focusing scale are not exactly on the top of the lens, and this is not the little difference you observe between the other current mades: it is enough to prevent the automatic diaph tou couple correctly, so if I you have the opportunity to buy a preselection lens designed for Edixa (Schneider for exemple), I would recommand to try it on the body you want to use...

From aab: Very interesting! I have a Edixa-mat BL and it's mount is an ordinary screw mount. Mounts my SMC Takumar lenses without problems ...
Apparently this may be a common problem. I recently bought an Yashica Electro X and the lens do not mount properly - about 40 degrees off.

From Kevin de Lacy:
(About edixa-mat kadett) This is a cool little camera. It takes all the M42 thread lenses I've mounted on it with no problems. It's working perfectly, but I've been warned about the film transport system. Just don't let it fling back once you've wound it on!

From Alex:

At the time I bought my Edixa, I was stationed in Verona, Italy with the US Army and had really just started getting seriously interested in Photography. Being a staff Sergeant with three little girls and another on the way I didn't really have a lot of money to spend on photo equipment. The Edixa was the best I could afford as I could purchase it through the PX. The fact that it had both a waist level and a prism finder was one of the major selling points. At that time I was interested in doing close up work so the prism finder was quite convenient.
At that time, I was working as a medical administrator. It wasn't until 1962 that I was able to get a job as an army photographer. At that time I was stationed at Ft Rucker, Al., the army aviation center and school. Due to my personal training and experience I was appointed as NCOIC of the post photo lab.
One of the most memorable experiences was the first time I photographed a stage performance in a theater. The slurp, thump of the shutter, mirror action was quite noticeable in a completely quite theater. I then went to the US Army Pictorial Center in Kaiserslautern, Germany and from there to the south east Asian Pictorial center in Vietnam where I had a combat photo team. I had specialized in criminal photography during this time which led to my final duty with the army as a criminal photographer.
All this time the faithful old Edixa was usually hung around my neck even when I was carrying a larger format camera. It proved to be a veritable work horse and at no time has it ever failed me. I defy anyone to say the same for all the later more cheaply built Japanese cameras that led to the demise of Wirgin Bros. Unfortunately, even today, the American public will purchase items with the bottom line (price) as the major reason for purchasing an item. The fact that they will have to replace it in the near future just doesn't seem to compute.
Being interested in computers today at 72 years of age and not desiring to set up a photo lab (even if I could stand that long before a tray of chemicals) has caused me to entertain the idea of purchasing a digital camera but at any time I have to go where conditions may be detrimental, the old Edixa will go along as a back up.

From Erik Rytter: I have two Edixa cameras with accessories as Novoflex etc. and I have been using them for 40 years without one single problem ! For 5 years the Edixa Reflex (older model) was used in Northeast Greenland and worked - although with somewhat slow shutterspeed below minus 15 C. I also have Nikon and Mamiya prof. cameras, but I like Edixa very much.
However I'm looking for a split rangefinder microprism - if anyone can help.

Any expirience with Edixa?
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